Tag: sensors

Wireless Sensor Market is Expected to Grow from $1.5 billion to $4.3 billion

Wireless Sensors: Technologies and Global Markets

NEW YORK, Dec. 18, 2014 /PRNewswire/ — This report forecasts the market size of wireless sensors for the years 2014-2019. It deals exclusively with wireless technologies employed in the personal area network (PAN) and local area network (LAN) topologies. It also classifies the market size for wireless sensor devices for individual end-vertical application by various parameters measured in terms of dollar and unit sales. Analysis of the challenges posed by technology and business issues and the steps taken by industry stakeholders to counter these challenges are also included.

Use this report to:

– Analyze the challenges posed by technology issues (e.g., power management) and the steps taken by industry stakeholders to counter these challenges.

– Receive an overview of the activities of influential companies.

– Evaluate the market size for wireless sensor devices for individual end-vertical applications by region in terms of dollar and unit sales.

– Examine crucial, innovative breakthroughs by means of a detailed patent analysis.

Highlights

– The global market for wireless sensor devices reached nearly $1.2 billion in 2013. This market is expected to grow to $1.5 billion in 2014 and $4.3 billion in 2019, with a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 23.7% between 2014 and 2019.

– Home automation and other indoor applications as a market segment is expected to reach $653 million in 2014. The segment is expected to grow to $1.6 billion in 2019, with a CAGR of 20.1% for the five-year period, 2014 to 2019.

– Energy infrastructure applications as a market segment is expected to reach $383 million in 2014. The segment is expected to grow to $1.1 billion in 2019, with a CAGR of 23.5% for the five-year period, 2014 to 2019.

INTRODUCTION

Wireless sensor devices connect sensors wirelessly among each other as well as to monitoring and management setups. This report forecasts the market size of wireless sensors for the years 2012-2019. This report is an update of the one published in 2011. The wireless sensor landscape is characterized by diversity on the following fronts:

– The parameter being sensed.

– The end-vertical application.

– Wireless technology adopted.

Consequently, the market for wireless sensors is fragmented and disorganized. This report straddles this diversity and presents a consolidated picture of the market. Since

the publication of the last report, wireless sensors continue to make new headways, but are unable to bite the bullet when it comes to consolidation among diverse wireless

technologies. This failure has resulted in an adverse impact on the growth rate, which nevertheless remains attractive. While the sensing principles of wireless sensors are consistent with that of wireline sensors, wireless sensors have the challenge of operating with an attractive form and with robust power management. The payout is spectacular. In most cases, wireless sensors beat their wireline counterparts hands down in the following aspects:

– Physical reach.

– Time to roll out and install.

– Pricing.

– Suitability in harsh operating environments.

Wireless sensor devices are the actual sensing elements that are present in the wireless sensor networks. They do not include gateways or management software. This report deals exclusively with wireless technologies employed in the personal area network (PAN) and local area network (LAN) topologies. It does not cover wide area networks (e.g., commercial cellular networks).

via Wireless Sensors: Technologies and Global Markets — NEW YORK, Dec. 18, 2014 /PRNewswire/ —.

Innovative, Lower Cost Sensors and Controls Yield Better Energy Efficiency

Released: 27-Feb-2015 2:05 PM EST
Source Newsroom: Oak Ridge National Laboratory

Newswise — Regulating comfort in small commercial buildings could become more efficient and less expensive thanks to an innovative low-cost wireless sensor technology being developed by researchers at the Department of Energy’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

Buildings are responsible for about 40 percent of the energy consumed in the United States. Studies indicate that advanced sensors and controls have the potential to reduce the energy consumption of buildings by 20-30 percent.

“It is widely accepted that energy-consuming systems such as heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) units in buildings are under, or poorly, controlled causing them to waste energy,” said Patrick Hughes, director of ORNL’s Building Technologies Program. “Buildings could increase their energy efficiency if control systems had access to additional information.”

Collecting data such as outside air and room temperature, humidity, light level, occupancy and pollutants is currently cost prohibitive, whether the information is gathered by inexpensive conventional sensors that must be wired, or by using today’s expensive $150-300 per node wireless sensors.

ORNL’s new wireless sensor prototype could reduce costs to $1-10 per node by leveraging advanced manufacturing techniques such as additive roll-to-roll manufacturing. This process enables electronics components like circuits, sensors, antennae, and photovoltaic cells and batteries to be printed on flexible plastic substrates (base materials). The nodes can be installed without wires using a peel-and-stick adhesive backing.

“If commercially available at the target price point, there would be endless application possibilities where the installed cost to improve the control of energy-consuming systems would pay for itself through lower utility bills in only a few years,” Hughes said.

The ultra-low power smart sensors collect and send data to a receiver, which can capture data from many different peel-and-stick nodes and provide the information to the energy-consuming system. The more information received, the better the building’s energy management.

Both new construction and retrofitted buildings can benefit from ORNL’s smart sensors.

“This technology provides the information that enables ongoing continuous commissioning, fault detection and diagnosis, and service organization notifications when needed, ensuring optimal building system operations throughout their service life,” said ORNL’s Teja Kuruganti, principal investigator on the low-cost wireless sensors project.

ORNL is currently in negotiations to establish a cooperative research and development agreement with a premier international electronics manufacturer to make the low-cost wireless sensors commercially available.

This project is sponsored by DOE’s Building Technologies Office in DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.

UT-Battelle manages ORNL for the Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, and is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit http://science.energy.gov/.

– Sara Shoemaker, shoemakerms@ornl.gov

Caption: ORNL researchers are experimenting with additive roll-to-roll manufacturing techniques to develop low-cost wireless sensors. ORNL’s Pooran Joshi shows how the process enables electronics components to be printed on flexible plastic substrates.

via Innovative, Lower Cost Sensors and Controls Yield Better Energy Efficiency.