Tag: HVAC

Join the Advanced RTU Campaign!

What is the Advanced RTU Campaign?

Older, inefficient commercial rooftop unit (RTU) air conditioning systems are common and can waste from $900 to $3,700 per unit annually, depending on the building size and type.  By replacing or retrofitting them, you can save money, improve your energy efficiency, make your building more comfortable, and help the environment.  The Advanced RTU Campaign (ARC) encourages commercial building owners and operators to replace their old RTUs with more efficient units or to retrofit their RTUs with advanced controls in order to take advantage of these benefits. 
RTU Blurb

What are the benefits of joining?

ARC provides building owners and operators with access to information and expertise to lower facility operating costs while maintaining or improving building occupant comfort.  Joining the Campaign allows you to:
Leverage campaign resources and technical expertise in evaluating savings opportunities
Stay informed on innovative RTU technologies and resources produced through the campaign
Gain recognition, achievement awards, and participate in case studies
  (pending submitting documentation of implementing a replacement or retrofit)

How do I get involved in ARC?

There are two ways to get involved in ARC, by joining as a Participant (building owner/manager) or Supporter (assist implementation of RTU replacement/retrofit). 

  1. Joining the Campaign as a Participant means making a pledge to evaluate and implement an RTU replacement or retrofit.  Commercial and government buildings are eligible to join the Campaign as Participants.
  2. Joining the Campaign as a Supporter means committing to promoting the benefits of energy efficiency commercial cooling. Trade and industry organizations, utility and efficiency programs, and manufacturers and service providers are eligible to join the Campaign as Supporters.

Download Advanced RTU Resources:

Commercial EE HVAC Systems Market Expected to Reach $47.5 Billion in 2024

BOULDER, Colo., Aug 04, 2015 (BUSINESS WIRE) — A new report from Navigant Research analyzes the global market for seven energy-efficient technologies that are the primary components of commercial heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, including market forecasts for revenue, through 2024.

HVAC equipment accounts for nearly 40 percent of total global building energy consumption, while commercial buildings consume about 12 percent of the world’s energy supply. As concerns about the environmental impact of energy generation and uncertainty over future energy prices increase, efficiency improvements in commercial HVAC equipment are becoming more enticing. Click to tweet: According to a new report from Navigant Research, global revenue for commercial energy-efficient HVAC systems is expected to increase from $22.8 billion in 2015 to $47.5 billion in 2024.

“Almost universally, building owners are investing in HVAC equipment to lower energy consumption, lower operating costs, and lower the impact on the environment,” says Benjamin Freas, senior research analyst with Navigant Research. “Not only is this driving incremental increases in the efficiency of equipment, it is shifting design standards—we’re seeing variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems being designed in place of unitary systems and the use of heat pumps is expanding.”

While growth in commercial HVAC sales for energy-efficient buildings is recovering in the United States, that growth is counterbalanced by sharp declines in China and is tempered by stagnation in Europe, according to the report. However, energy-efficient commercial HVAC equipment is still expected to experience moderate to strong growth globally through 2024, driven primarily by stricter environmental standards and demand for lower operating costs.

The report, Energy-Efficient HVAC Systems for Commercial Buildings, analyzes the global market opportunity for energy-efficient commercial HVAC systems, including unitary systems, heat pumps, furnaces, boilers, VRF systems, chillers, and geothermal heat pumps. The report provides a comprehensive assessment of the demand drivers, business models, and policy and regulatory factors. Global market forecasts for HVAC systems, segmented by region and technology, extend through 2024. The report also examines the major technologies related to these systems and profiles key industry players in depth. An Executive Summary of the report is available for free download on the Navigant Research website.

About Navigant Research

Navigant Research, the dedicated research arm of Navigant, provides market research and benchmarking services for rapidly changing and often highly regulated industries. In the energy sector, Navigant Research focuses on in-depth analysis and reporting about global clean technology markets. The team’s research methodology combines supply-side industry analysis, end-user primary research and demand assessment, and deep examination of technology trends to provide a comprehensive view of the Smart Energy, Smart Utilities, Smart Transportation, and Smart Buildings sectors. Additional information about Navigant Research can be found at www.navigantresearch.com.

About Navigant

Navigant Consulting, Inc. is an independent specialized, global professional services firm that combines deep industry knowledge with technical expertise to enable companies to defend, protect and create value. With a focus on industries and clients facing transformational change and significant regulatory and legal issues, the Firm serves clients primarily in the healthcare, energy and financial services sectors which represent highly complex market and regulatory environments. Professional service offerings include strategic, financial, operational, technology, risk management, compliance, investigative solutions, dispute resolutions services and business process management services. The Firm provides services to companies, legal counsel and governmental agencies. The business is organized in four reporting segments – Disputes, Investigations & Economics; Financial, Risk & Compliance; Healthcare; and Energy. More information about Navigant can be found at navigant.com.

* The information contained in this press release concerning the report, Energy-Efficient HVAC Systems for Commercial Buildings, is a summary and reflects Navigant Research’s current expectations based on market data and trend analysis. Market predictions and expectations are inherently uncertain and actual results may differ materially from those contained in this press release or the report. Please refer to the full report for a complete understanding of the assumptions underlying the report’s conclusions and the methodologies used to create the report. Neither Navigant Research nor Navigant undertakes any obligation to update any of the information contained in this press release or the report.

SOURCE: Navigant Research

Navigant Research
Ellie Stutts, +1-202-973-3249
ellie.stutts@navigant.com
or
Megan Maupin, +1-312-583-5703
megan.maupin@navigant.com

Huge Saving on Heating & Cooling Costs with Advanced Energy Efficiency Controls

via PNNL: News – Electricity use slashed with efficiency controls for heating, cooling.
Frances White, PNNL, (509) 375-6904

RICHLAND, Wash. – Commercial buildings could cut their heating and cooling electricity use by an average of 57 percent with advanced energy-efficiency controls, according to a year-long trial of the controls at malls, grocery stores and other buildings across the country. The study demonstrated higher energy savings than what was predicted in earlier computer simulations by the same researchers.

“We’ve long known that heating and cooling are among the biggest energy consumers in buildings, largely because most buildings don’t use sophisticated controls,” said the study’s lead researcher, engineer Srinivas Katipamula of the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. “But our tests of controls installed at real, working commercial buildings clearly demonstrate how much more energy efficient air-conditioning systems can be.”

This research was supported by DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy and the Bonneville Power Administration.

Sitting on the roofs of many commercial buildings are shiny metal boxes containing heating, cooling, ventilation and air conditioning (also known as HVAC) units. These are pre-made in a factory and have all their components inside a box, leading the industry to call them “packaged” HVAC units. Another kind of commercial HVAC, called air handling units, have long used sophisticated controls to ensure they work as efficiently as possible. But packaged units are often allowed to run for hours on end, even if they aren’t needed, and receive little maintenance.

Packaged HVAC units consume the same amount of electricity each year as 8 million U.S. residents, or about 2,600 trillion British thermal units of energy. All those ignored and often-inefficient HVAC systems add up, creating higher power bills and contributing to the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions.

Putting an idea to the test

Katipamula and his PNNL colleagues have spent their careers thinking up ways to reduce energy use in buildings. In 2011, they set out to adapt the controls already found in air handling HVAC units for use in packaged rooftop HVAC units. The goal was to enable packaged units to automatically adjust their operations based on conditions inside and outside a building. Using sensors and variable-speed motors, the controls decide when and how fast ventilation fans should run, and if the units can use naturally cold air from the outside instead of mechanically cooling indoor air.

While the PNNL team was evaluating how these controls could work, they learned a few companies were simultaneously and independently in the process of developing such advanced controls. During the summer of 2012, the team installed one of the commercially available control kits on 66 rooftop HVAC units at eight volunteer commercial buildings in Washington state, Ohio, California and Pennsylvania. The buildings included shopping malls, grocery stores, big-box stores and a medical clinic. The installed devices, manufactured by Transformative Wave of Kent, Wash., were chosen because they most closely resembled the advanced controls PNNL had envisioned.

Real energy savings

Katipamula and his colleagues found that, compared to standard operations, the HVAC units using advanced controls cut their energy use by an average of 57 percent. The actual energy savings ranged from 20 to 90 percent. Larger buildings such as malls, which need bigger HVAC units, saved more energy than smaller buildings. And buildings that ran ventilation fans more, such as stores open long hours, tended to save more energy.

Translating the energy savings into dollars saved depended on local power costs. Nationwide, energy costs an average of 10 cents per kilowatt-hour, though areas with abundant and inexpensive power supplies often pay less and large cities with greater energy needs generally pay more. When using the national average, researchers found all the field-tested HVAC units would have saved an average of $1,489 annually per unit. The team calculated it would take a building owner three years to recoup the cost of buying and installing advanced controls with that average cost savings. Commercial buildings often have multiple rooftop HVAC units, so actual savings per building would depend on the number of units used.

But the exact payback period depends on several factors. To help building owners weigh the costs, the research team developed a table that lays out which specific combinations of an HVAC unit’s size, the number of hours its fan runs daily and the local energy rate would result in a three-year or less payback period. The team concluded installing advanced controls in smaller units with a capacity of 15 tons or less could achieve a three-year payback in areas where energy costs 12 cents per kilowatt-hour or more, or where sufficient utility incentives were available.

“I’m proud to see the advanced controls my colleagues and I evaluated not only work in the real world, but produce significant energy savings,” Katipamula said. “We hope commercial building owners will be inspired by these tangible savings and install advanced controls in their rooftop HVAC units.”

Building owners interested in upgrading or replacing their HVAC systems can learn more from the Advanced Rooftop Campaign, which was formed by DOE’s Better Building Alliance, ASHRAE (also known as the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers) and the Retail Industry Leaders Association.

REFERENCES: S. Katipamula, W. Wang and M. Vowles, “Improving Operating Efficiency of Packaged Air Conditioners & Heat Pumps,” ASHRAE Journal, March 2014.

W. Wang, S. Katipamula, H. Ngo, R. Underhill, D. Taasevigen and R. Lutes, “Advanced Rooftop Control (ARC) Retrofit: Field-Test Results,” report for DOE, July 2013.

 

The Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) Primer

Variable refrigerant flow (VRF) systems, which were first introduced in Japan in 1982, have become popular in many countries; however, they are relatively unknown in the United States. VRF systems can condition multiple zones in a building, each of which may have different simultaneous heating and cooling needs. Using sophisticated control technologies, VRF systems can modulate the amount of refrigerant sent to each zone independently. This technology provides substantial energy savings by staying in tune with diverse and changing space conditioning loads.

To learn more about the many VRF benefits read our guide below:

 

Cypress Wireless Pneumatic Thermostat Overview

The worldwide, patent pending Wireless Pneumatic Thermostat (WPT) delivers DDC-like functionality at a fraction of the time and cost of existing legacy systems. The WPT is installed without the need to change out pneumatic pipes, run wires, replace actuators or disturb tenants. It is not necessary to upgrade entire building at one time; installers may selectively retrofit individual thermostats for incremental benefits.

Cypress Envirosystems (Cypress) delivers high-performance, mixed-signal, programmable solutions that provide customers with rapid time-to-market and exceptional system value. Cypress’ offerings include the PSoC® programmable system-on-chip, USB controllers and general-purpose programmable clocks and memories. Cypress also offers wired and wireless connectivity technologies ranging from its CyFi™ Low-Power RF solution, to West Bridge® and EZ-USB® FX2LP controllers that enhance connectivity and performance in multimedia handsets. Cypress serves numerous markets including consumer, computation, data communications, automotive and industrial.

Conventional retrofits of pneumatic controls to DDC typically cost over $2,500 per zone and causes significant disruption to building tenants. The long investment payback (usually four to seven years) and the need to wait for tenants to vacate mean that most legacy buildings never upgrade despite compelling energy and productivity savings.
 

cypress

 

The new Cypress WPT accomplishes the same retrofit in less than 20 minutes, for less than 20% of the cost of conventional DDC. This means that retrofits can be performed right away, even while a building is fully occupied, and achieve payback periods of about one year. These are key advantages for stimulus funding eligibility.

The WPT is directly compatible with the majority of legacy pneumatic thermostats from Honeywell, Johnson Controls, Robertshaw, and Siemens. It can seamlessly integrate with modern building automation systems from virtually all major vendors via BACnet/IP. Numerous 3rd party systems integrators have successfully implemented the BACnet link including Emcor, ACCO, Johnson Controls, Siemens, RSD-Total Control, Wolf Mechanical, Syserco and others.

In addition, the system has completed compatibility testing with utility Auto-Demand Response systems, developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories, and is being used by California utilities to shed electrical load during peak consumption periods.

According to Dan Ginn, General Manager of RSD-Total Controls, a distributor and installer for the WPT, “In today’s challenging business environment, this technology can be a savior to help us implement projects that are otherwise economically unfeasible.”

“The Wireless Pneumatic Thermostat will help unlock an enormous reservoir of potential energy savings from legacy facilities, including older federal buildings,” said Bien Irace, Senior Vice President of Business Development for Cypress Envirosystems.

Strengths:

  • Integrates into current BMS platforms with standard protocols
  • Installation time is minimal; Building shutdown not required
  • Makes utility programs such as DR more viable

Weaknesses:

  • Functionality is only as viable as the pneumatic system it is being connected with.

No Sweat:CoolNYC Keeps Window ACs from Hogging All the Electricity

This summer, New Yorkers with window ACs don’t have to come home to a sauna or an icebox after being out all day. No longer do they have to decide between leaving the AC unit off or on while they are out. Instead, they can join coolNYC, the popular window air conditioner program that offers users technology to control their AC temperature and turn any room air conditioner on/off remotely via their computer or smartphone. The program is returning to Con Edison customers in 2015 with more ways for New Yorkers to save energy, earn rewards, and stay cool.

coolNYC, a Con Edison program offered in partnership with ThinkEco, allows New Yorkers to work together to ensure the reliability of NYC’s electric grid. Customers who join coolNYC can control their room AC from anywhere and earn coolPoints through participation in coolNYC Events. During an event, coolNYC will temporarily reduce the customer’s AC energy use. coolNYC Events will generally take place when the electric grid is under strain, typically on very hot days.

“Last year, thousands of New Yorkers participated in coolNYC and saved money and energy by controlling their window ACs. This year, we’ve expanded the program to provide more choices for New Yorkers,” said David MacRae, residential customer solutions manager of Con Edison. “Con Edison is constantly looking for new ways to engage our customers and provide them opportunities to save energy.”

NYC customers can sign up for the program now at coolnycprogram.com. Additionally, customers who participated last year can now re-enroll. For new customers, coolNYC has four ways to participate and earn coolPoints this year.

  • Try It: You are in control. Simply sign up to earn up to two smartAC kits for the summer. The smartAC kits are yours to keep if you set them up and fully participate in at least three coolNYC Events, and you’ll earn coolPoints for your participation.
  • Buy It: The smartAC kit is available for purchase for $139.99. You can participate in coolNYC, earn coolPoints, save energy, and help your city.
  • Friedrich Kuhl: If you own or plan to buy a Friedrich Kuhl air conditioner and FriedrichLink Wi-Fi Adapter, you can enroll in the coolNYC program to earn coolPoints. You can earn more than $100 in coolPoints.
  • Frigidaire Cool-Connect: If you purchase the new Frigidaire Cool-Connect air conditioner, you can enroll in the coolNYC program to earn coolPoints. You can earn more than $100 in coolPoints.

For Friedrich and Frigidaire customers signing up their Wi-Fi enabled air conditioners, the process is as simple as going to www.coolnycprogram.com to register and “opt in” their existing connected ACs. Customers without a Wi-Fi enabled unit can buy or try a smartAC kit, which includes a modlet plug and a smart thermostat. The customer can use this kit to turn their room air conditioner on or off, or adjust the temperature remotely from any computer or smartphone.

It’s Hot Out There
Con Edison estimates there are over 6 million window air conditioners in New York City, accounting for 20 percent of peak summertime electricity demand. On a hot summer day, the strain on the electric grid can be immense, doing your part to reduce energy use can make a big difference with only a small, temporary temperature adjustment.

During a coolNYC Event, the coolNYC program may turn your AC on and off periodically or change your AC to a slightly higher thermostat setting to reduce power usage. Events typically last for four hours and can occur between three and 10 times per summer. Customers will receive notifications based on their preferences in advance of each event. If needed, a customer can override the temperature adjustment and choose not to participate in a coolNYC Event.

To learn more about coolNYC and how to turn your window AC into a smart summertime appliance, go to www.coolnycprogram.com. Follow us on twitter @coolnycprogram.

About Con Edison
Con Edison is a subsidiary of Consolidated Edison, Inc. [NYSE: ED], one of the nation’s largest investor-owned energy companies, with approximately $13 billion in annual revenues and $44 billion in assets. The utility provides electric, gas and steam service to more than 3 million customers in New York City and Westchester County, N.Y. For additional financial, operations and customer service information, visit www.conEd.com, our green site, www.coned.com/waystosave, or find us on Facebook at Con Edison.

About ThinkEco, Inc.
New York City-based ThinkEco, Inc. is a leading Internet-of-Things (IoT) technology company, providing easy-to-use energy efficiency solutions for utilities, enterprises, and homes. ThinkEco’s patented IoT technology platform enables cloud-based energy efficient and connected home applications powered by intelligent algorithms. ThinkEco also provides an attractive customer user interface and fully functional API with which utility and technology partners can integrate. For more information, visit www.thinkecoinc.com, follow the company on Twitter @ThinkEco and find us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ThinkEco.

SOURCE coolNYC

Everything you need to know about cooling from the DOE

As summer starts to heat up and temperatures rise, many of us are cranking up the air conditioners to stay cool. It should come as no surprise then that air conditioners use about 5 percent of all the electricity produced in the U.S., costing homeowners more than $11 billion a year in energy costs.

This summer, instead of blasting the air conditioner (and blowing your electricity bills through the roof), you can take simple actions that will help you beat the heat. For example, replacing a dirty, clogged air filter with a clean one can lower your air conditioner’s energy consumption by 5-15 percent, while using a ceiling fan will allow you to raise the thermostat setting about 4 degrees without impacting your comfort.

Whether you’re looking to save on cooling costs with your current air conditioner or you want to upgrade to a more energy-efficient model, our new Energy Saver 101 infographic has you covered. From how air conditioners work to the different types of systems on the market to proper maintenance, the infographic lays out everything you need to know about home cooling. Plus, throughout the infographic you’ll find energy-saving tips and advice on common air conditioner problems.

With just a few small changes, you can relax in comfort this summer while saving some cold, hard cash.

For more ways to save money by saving energy, visit Energy Saver.

homecooling101_long

New Water Heating Efficiency Standards Deliver Great Savings, But There’s More to Be Done

via New Water Heating Efficiency Standards Deliver Great Savings, But There’s More to Be Done | Robin Roy’s Blog | Switchboard, from NRDC.

For those of us working toward smarter, cleaner, cheaper water heating for households, there’s a lot happening in Washington, D.C. With about 15 percent of U.S. household energy use going to heat the water we use to wash dishes and take showers, even small improvements make a big difference.

First, new energy efficiency standards for water heaters issued by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) take effect Thursday (April 16). These standards were finalized in April 2010, giving the water heater industry time to plan and make necessary investments to manufacture the more efficient versions as of April 16. DOE estimates that these new standards will net consumers savings of up to $8.4 billion over the next 30 years. Total energy savings through 2045 are an estimated 2.6 quads, about as much energy as used by 15 million households annually. NRDC is a longstanding and strong supporter of federal energy efficiency standards, and had pushed for these standards to be adopted. It’s good to see them go into effect.

A key aspect of the new standards is that large electric water heaters (over 55 gallons) will use heat pump technology, which can cut energy use by more than 50 percent. That’s a huge improvement – these heaters will use less than half the energy of electric resistance water heaters. Boding well for the future of efficient, economic water heating, manufacturers have also introduced heat pump water heaters in the highly popular 50-gallon size. This is great news, and holds enormous promise for energy and consumer savings beyond what DOE estimated.

Second, with strong bipartisan support, the U.S. Senate recently passed S. 535 Energy Efficiency Improvement Act of 2015 introduced by Senators Portman (OH) and Shaheen (NH), including a provision to exempt “grid-enabled water heaters” from the federal energy efficiency standards for large water heaters. These are large electric resistance water heaters with communication and control capability that allow them to be used as low-cost thermal batteries in an energy storage or demand response program (demand response involves consumers temporarily changing their normal consumption in response to pricing or incentives at times of high wholesale electricity costs or reliability concerns). This can make the electricity system more flexible and ready to use renewable generation with variable output, like wind and solar. Smart grid-responsive water heaters present a promising possibility for a more efficient, more economic, and ultimately lower-emissions electricity system, even if they are less efficient individually. There’s much more to be learned about the possible role of smart water heaters and the trade-offs between system and component efficiency, and the legislation we support would foster much better understanding.

I had the pleasure of testifying in favor of water heater legislation a few weeks ago before the House of Representatives Subcommittee on Energy and Power. The House of Representatives passed legislation similar to S. 535 in 2014 with overwhelming bipartisan support. Hopefully, the House will once again pass legislation in the current Congress, and grid-enabled water heaters will have a clear path forward to the president’s desk. So the good news is we’re making progress, although there’s no date set yet for House action.

NRDC has only rarely supported exemptions from standards, but here we explored the opportunities that grid-enabled water heaters may offer for environmental and consumer benefit, found the case persuasive, and worked intensively with manufacturers, utilities, and other efficiency and environmental organizations to develop legislation that would deliver on the opportunity while not undermining the benefits of the new water heater efficiency standards. Importantly, the legislation is carefully designed to make sure that these water heaters are actually used in a demand response or energy storage program, and not a loophole to avoid the efficiency standards. Typically, legislation isn’t required to carve out a sensible exemption; DOE has the authority to adopt a waiver on its own. Here, however, DOE recently inexplicably decided to withdraw its own 2013 proposal for a waiver process for grid-enabled water heaters – an idea that manufacturers, utilities, and NRDC had all supported – making legislation necessary.

Looking ahead, we’ll continue to support the legislation on grid-enabled water heaters until it is enacted, and continue to promote smart, economic water heating of all types, including heat pump water heaters of all sizes.

And of course we’ll continue our longstanding work on great energy standards that deliver environmental and consumer benefits on a wide range of appliances.

Con Edison Customers Went Green & Earned Green In 2014

Energy Efficiency Programs Prevent Emissions, Provide Incentive $$$

Con Edison Media Relations
For Immediate Release: March 25, 2015

Nearly 35,000 Con Edison customers who took advantage of the company’s energy efficiency programs in 2014 helped keep New York’s air clean and earned a record amount of incentives while doing so.

The customers’ projects — which included lighting, HVAC equipment, building management systems and other improvements — will keep more than 87,000 tons of carbon out of the air annually.

That’s the equivalent of taking 14,500 cars off the road.

“Technology is bringing us new ways to help our customers save energy, and keep New York clean,” said Rebecca Craft, Con Edison’s director of Energy Efficiency and Demand Management. “And our customers benefit financially with incentives for energy-saving improvements and lower bills.”

Con Edison customers earned almost $60 million in incentives in 2014 for their energy efficiency upgrades.

The company’s small business program proved to be particularly attractive last year, as the number of customers who got incentives for electricity-saving upgrades rose 61 percent to 9,523. Those customers earned $35.1 million in incentives.

Since 2009, which is when Con Edison began its energy efficiency programs, more than 220,000 customers have helped to prevent 330,000 tons of carbon emissions and received $190 million in incentives.

Con Edison has energy-efficiency programs for every type of customer. To learn more, go to http://www.coned.com/energyefficiency/.

The company offers residential customers rebates of up to $1,000 to replace old cooling and heating systems and rebates up to $50 for appliance upgrades. Small business customers can get free energy surveys and free or subsidized upgrades to help them use less electricity in certain neighborhoods.

Customers with multifamily buildings of five to 75 units can get free energy surveys and rebates for energy-efficient electric and gas equipment in common areas. Commercial and industrial customers can save up to 50 percent on an energy efficiency survey and receive incentives for upgrading equipment.

Con Edison also has a Demand Response program that pays customers to curtail their electrical usage when demand for electricity is high. The enrollment deadline is April 1 for customers who want to being receiving benefits in May. Get more information here:http://coned.com/energyefficiency/demand_response.asp.

The company also increased its Demand Management incentives for owners and managers of large buildings who take advantage of technologies like battery storage, thermal storage, and LED lighting to reduce usage at peak times. Get information here:http://coned.com/energyefficiency/demand_management_incentives.asp

Con Edison is a subsidiary of Consolidated Edison, Inc. (NYSE: ED), one of the nation’s largest investor-owned energy companies, with approximately $13 billion in annual revenues and $44 billion in assets. The utility provides electric, gas and steam service to more than three million customers in New York City and Westchester County, N.Y. For more financial, operations and customer service information, visit www.conEd.com, learn energy tips at,www.coned.com/waystosave, or find us on Facebook at Con Edison.

via Con Edison: newsroom – Con Edison Customers Went Green & Earned Green In 2014.